Research Grants

In the past two years out efforts in raising money for brain aneurysm research have gone to specific people to support their effort in learning more about brain aneurysm’s. In the future we hope to continue to contribute to more research.

 
 
Assistant Professor  The Vivian L. Smith Department of Neurosurgery  McGovern Medical School  The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Assistant Professor

The Vivian L. Smith Department of Neurosurgery

McGovern Medical School

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Devin W. McBride, Ph.D.


“I think one of the most important things researchers can do is to share their work with the public.My research focuses on the after effects of the ruptured aneurysm. Within a week or two of aneurysm rupture, about 1/3 of patients will experience decline in their function/behavior, which is due to micro-clots (very small blood clots) forming in the brain blood vessels stopping blood flow and also blood vessel constriction (vasospasm). My work focuses on both of these areas. Currently I am testing in mice different FDA-approved drugs to prevent micro-clots from forming after subarachnoid hemorrhage. There are many (maybe ~100) drugs which could be used, but they all work a little differently. So the big question is, which one should be used? I am testing various drugs to see which ones work. Interestingly, I am finding that indeed, some of them do not work to improve mouse function after SAH. I am hoping to narrow the list of possible drugs into a list which can be tested in a clinical trial(s). I should have a good idea of the possible drug candidates by the BAF symposium this September. I would be happy to share more results then. Thank you very much for your support of research for this very serious but under-studied disease.”

 


Aichi Chien, Ph.D.

“Our study aims to analyze detailed information about aneurysm natural history. By improving understanding of the progression of aneurysm initiation, growth, and rupture, our goal is to achieve early detection and personalized treatment planning. In the past year, we analyzed aneurysm patients, studying both patient history and aneurysm images. We found that in addition to patient history, aneurysms shape is an indication of high risk of growth. We are currently analyzing  longitudinal data gathered over several years which includes the progression of aneurysm growth and the risks associate with it. We are in the process of analyzing how different disease factors such as heart disease relate to the risk of aneurysms. We believe that by learning from longitudinally-followed aneurysms, we will be able to provide better detection and follow-up strategies.”

Associate Professor  Division of Interventional Neuroradiology Dept.of Radiology, UCLA Medical School

Associate Professor

Division of Interventional Neuroradiology
Dept.of Radiology, UCLA Medical School